Ted Brandt started working at Wilson’s Fitness in 1995 as a personal trainer.  He had served in the United States Air Force, and separating in 1994, headed from there to college.  During school and the early days of his career working at Boone Hospital, he trained clients, until about 2001.  While obtaining his M.B.A. and M.H.A. Ted worked as a Licensed Physical Therapist Assistant, for six years. Upon graduation, he moved into a hospital administrative role and is currently the Director of Clinic Operations at MUHC. Throughout his academic and professional endeavors, Ted has always pursued an active lifestyle, staying fit by running competitively (including marathons), biking, strength training, hiking and repelling, and getting dirty in the occasional Tough Mudder.  He loves to get outside no matter the season.  You can spot him running the streets of Columbia in his signature ball cap, or if it’s cold, you might recognize his beanie-covered head.

ted In 2009, Ted started teaching Les Mills RPM because he enjoyed indoor spinning and favored the LM approach of Position, Push and Pace.  His experience with patients in physical therapy has guided his approach to training others: helping them achieve muscular balance, strength and flexibility.  Walking the walk, Ted’s goal is to incorporate a weekly yoga class into his own training. His exercise philosophy is “simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.” He keeps it simple by using basic moves and focusing on the proven formula: power = force x velocity.  It’s safe to say Ted loves what he does, and his participants and team members most definitely benefit.  “I choose not to get paid for teaching cycling at Wilson’s because I enjoy it too much and don’t want it to feel at all like a job.”

April 1, 2015

Here are just a few fitness tips to keep your body and fitness tracker HAPPY! If you’re not moving, you’re missing out on key health and weight-management boosters. No matter what fitness level you are on, setting a goal can be a motivating way to improve your overall health. There are numerous methods to keep track of your fitness, from heart rate tracking to pedometers. The American Heart Association suggests walking 10,000 steps a day to maintain your fitness and to decrease the risk of disease brought on by a sedentary lifestyle. Struggling to meet that goal of 10,000 steps a day?Walking..

1)    Walk and Talk! Talking on the phone is a great opportunity to get in steps without thinking about it. Whether it’s a work call you can take outside or a personal call with a friend, those minutes on the phone can add up.

2)    Step it up! We’ve certainly all heard the tip to take the stairs over the elevator, but are you doing it? You’ve got to get there anyways, so you might as well torch a few extra calories doing so!

3)    Buddy Up! Set a time to meet a friend for a routine walk. Time will fly chatting with a friend and you’ll be less likely to ditch the walk if someone else is counting on you. Could you add in a family walk after dinner?

4)    Wear it! Wear a fitness tracker and take advantage of it! This reminder will encourage you to get more active and track your progress throughout the day. Many of these trackers also let you interact and challenge friends!

5)    Redirect! Break out of your habits and take a new way to work! Park in the back of the parking lot or use the furthest entrance! Can you find a new route to the copy machine or water fountain?

March 3, 2015

By: Lisa Kent

When Betty Bohon started teaching group fitness classes 28 years ago, Wilson’s on Forum (the big house) didn’t exist. What is FIT and the MAC now, was Club Woodrail then, and that’s where Betty taught Hi/Lo Aerobics. Barefoot. On a mat.  Much to the relief of her poor feet, Nike invented the pump shoe and Reebok came out with their iconic white high tops with the double Velcro strap.  Wearing shoes, Betty taught step aerobics and strength classes, and for Slide classes, she covered those shoes with attractive booties.  (If you don’t know what Slide is, watch here:  http://goo.gl/ofoNjs) As times have changed, she’s kept up with fitness trends.  She’s added cross-training and adopting new programs to keep working out as fresh and exciting as ever, as an instructor and as a strong, healthy woman of a certain age (ask to see a photo of her grandson, Luke).  Betty has seen the variety of classes grow exponentially—there is literally something for everyone of every age—and she loves to see people find the right fit for them.  She currently teaches BOSU, RPM and Hot Barre. _DSC6014Betty was almost 30 before she worked out for fitness; she had no school sports, no cheerleading, no dance.  Every fitness class she taught was a new adventure for her and she realized if she could do it, anyone could.

After her first child was born in 1978, to lose baby weight, Betty started running and playing racquetball and was quickly hooked on fitness.  Many 5Ks, 10Ks and marathons later, she added aerobics class to her routine and fell in love with the combination of fitness, music and people.  Betty had already been teaching racquetball clinics to kids at Spaulding Racquetball Club in Columbia, and in 1996 when she started teaching racquetball at Wilson’s Fitness (the old location on Forum), her pals and fellow instructors, JoAnn Wilson and Fran Welek, coaxed her into becoming a group fitness instructor and a star was born. A high school teacher by trade, she was a natural, and found her passion motivating people to get fit and live longer.  “I have always believed in the fact that our bodies are a gift and we should take good care of them.  This was instilled in me by my parents and my faith.”

For over 30 years she’s been inspiring people and telling them, it’s never too late to start. “Work out one hour, live a day longer!” she is fond of saying.  What she loves most about teaching is the high, the joy she gets from her members which hasn’t changed in all these years.  “When I am teaching group classes it’s like the world stops and everything slows down; worries go away and I don’t want it to end!  I enjoy seeing people getting excited after completing their first class and that look of  ‘I really made it!’”   Betty has seen the industry change vastly over the course of her career.  For example, music has always been an important motivator, but, now rather than spending hours making cassette tapes, recording 3-5 seconds between songs, or waiting for ordered pre-designed aerobic music to come in the mail, now she can make a playlist on her iPhone right before class.  (She also loves dry-fit clothes vs. 100% cotton since her nickname is Sweaty Betty.) When she talks about the “maturation process (I don’t call it aging)” she says she is older but wiser and she’s determined to stay ahead of the game.  Physically her body continues to change from the time she first started; she is much stronger than she ever was.  But, rebuilding her fitness level after taking time off, facing challenges with nagging injuries, these are realities for any fitness professional and for Betty, they just made her fight harder. ”I tell my classes not to let injuries get them down, but to fight and come back from them, stronger.”   Betty is an inspiration to us all and it wouldn’t surprise anyone if she were teaching for 30 more years at the rate she is going.  “The people that I get to see every day in my fitness classes mean the world to me.  I have made so many friends!  We are all on this fitness for life journey together.  I can’t imagine every stopping and that is why I’m still here.  Our RPM class mantra is ‘FIND A WAY.’  I have found a way and have loved every minute of the trip so far.  See you around the gym!”

January 8, 2015

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Understanding where you’re starting your fitness journey may be more important than where you would like to finish. Ideally, a functional movement screen would be a must for everyone starting back into a fitness program and a good idea for anyone looking to see how well they really move. It’s important to put yourself in the best starting position you can.   In less than 15 minutes we can see what major movement issues you have and determine some correctives to address those problem areas. You will also receive information on what movements you should avoid to minimize your injury risk. If you are starting some cardiovascular and/or strength training program- start in your comfort zone and see how your body responds to it. Don’t lift to complete muscular failure the first few times, this will just lead to DOMs (Delayed Onset Muscle soreness), a few missed workouts or an outright injury. Smart training leads to consistent progression over time and this is the key in reaching your longtime fitness goals. Remember…don’t only focus on your desired outcome, because understanding where the path starts is just as important as the end goal.

FMS1

November 21, 2014

By: Jeff Powell; RecoverFast

clean-airTo heal, to recover, to get the most out of this life, you need to breathe. After training people for over 25 years I have come to a simple conclusion: The most important thing a person can do to improve their fitness (mental, physical, spiritual) is to practice breathing. We have all been breathing our entire lives but few of us practice the act. Few of us breathe with focused intent. Few of us reap the exponentially greater rewards found in using breath to connect with our actions and our thoughts. Here are a few things that breathing facilitates:

  • Increased blood flow
  • Improved lymphatic flow
  • Better flow of cerebrospinal fluid
  • Higher activation of deep lumbar stabilizer muscles
  • An overall shift of the nervous system towards parasympathetic

To understand how each of these improves recovery, healing and therefore performance, I will expand on each item briefly:

  1. Blood Flow – Increased blood flow is synonymous with healing.  To heal, you require blood and all the oxygen and nutrients it brings along with it.  You also need it to carry away waste.
  2. Lymphatic Fluid Flow – Improved lymphatic fluid flow supports your immune response, recycling of blood plasma as well as your ability to move toxins out of your body.
  3. Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow – This is the stuff that cushions and nourishes your brain and spinal cord.  It needs to flow smoothly to perform its job optimally.
  4. Deep Lumbar Stabilizers – Activating these muscles acts as a link from your upper torso to your lower and vice versa.  Without good lumbar stability, you are forced to compensate your movements which leads to greater inflammation and slower recovery times.
  5. Parasympathetic – When your nervous system is shifted towards parasympathetic, you are geared for recovery.  This state of the nervous system is often referred to as “rest and digest”.  You can easily add “recover” to this list.  If you are able to shift rapidly to parasympathetic, you will have a greater ability to recover faster even during strenuous activity.  This is also the optimal neurological state for sexual activity.

Read more…

November 3, 2014holidayfruitornaments

The holiday season is rolling in…the temperatures are dropping, leaves are falling, and many holiday recipes are being passed around. While the holiday spirit is filled with cheer, it leaves many of us with a mix of emotions. The actual holiday festivities are so exciting, however the disappointment we’re bound to experience shortly follows. You know what we’re talking about. You dread the fact that your self-discipline may fail again and again during what we may call “the eating season.” Make a point this year to end the cycle! Instead of squeaking into the New Year with weight gain and a loss of fitness, this is the year to get in better shape during the holidays! You don’t have to do it alone, recruit some friends or join Wilson’s Fitness in the quest to break the cycle this holiday season.

1)     Plan ahead. Write down your intended workouts each week including the time, group class, or plan.

2)     Make it a date. Even if it is with yourself, write it down or tell a friend. Once someone knows or it’s written down you’re more likely to follow through.

3)     Switch it up. Don’t stick to your same old routine. Try a new group fitness class, or branch out and try something new to keep your workout fresh and exciting!

4)     Bring a healthy dish and eat beforehand. Skip the temptation of over indulging by eating beforehand and bring a healthy option to share!

5)     Drink lots of water. With lots of sugary holiday options around you- staying hydrated will keep you full and keep the cravings at a low.

6)     Get your friends involved! Turn a least one workout a week into a holiday party. There is no reason you can’t be festive with your workouts.

7)     Be resourceful. When you’re pinched for time, choose a far away parking spot when you’re running your errands.

8)     Keep moderation in mind. When you simply can’t say no, choose 1 portion of your favorite holiday treat and stick to it. 

September 25, 2014 By: John Stull, NSCA-CPT, FMSC, ViPR-PT   www.districtbootcamp.com HealthyEatingApplying healthy habits to your everyday eating patterns accelerate your results towards a happier, healthier, leaner body, and mind. If you can keep these five habits in mind at every meal, you will soon improve your body composition as well as your mood, energy, sleep, digestion, and workouts!

HABIT 1: EAT SLOWLY AND STOP AT 80% FULL

Have you ever left a restaurant or the dinner table feeling satisfied only to be hit by the stomach pains of overeating? Eating slow is critical in making changes to your diet. Slow down, listen to hunger and appetite cues, and finish eating at the right time. It takes about 20 minutes for food to travel from our mouth to our stomachs and for our brain to get the signal that our stomach is full. Attention to this habit could quickly put you on track and keep your from consuming too many calories.

Tips from Dr. Berardi and the Precision Nutrition Team

  • Have a seat when you eat
  • Slow Down
  • Turn off the TV
  • Eliminate distractions
  • Take smaller bites
  • Chew the food completely and taste it
  • Put the fork down after every few bites
  • Have a sip of water between bites
  • Chat with your dining partner

HABIT 2: EAT PROTEIN DENSE FOODS WITH EACH MEAL

Be intentional with the habit of eating protein at each meal and you will be well on your way to having to body composition you desire.  Why eat protein dense foods with each meal? Protein keeps you full for a longer period of time, and it promotes lean muscle mass in which the more lean mass we have, the higher our metabolisms stay.  Protein also offers the building blocks necessary for tissue growth and repair, improves bone density, promotes better sleep, lowers blood pressure and increases life span and quality of life. To ensure that you get enough protein in your diet, try to eat at least a palm sized portion of protein 3-4 times a day.

Here are some examples of protein dense foods;

  • Proteinslean meats such as beef, chicken, turkey, bison, venison
  • fish such as tuna, cod, salmon, (wild caught is always the safest and best tasting)
  • eggs
  • beans, legumes, peas, tofu, tempe
  • Protein supplements
  1. milk-based: whey, casein, milk protein blends
  1. plant-based: pea, hemp, rice, so

If you want to fast track your health and fitness to achieving the best you possible, eating protein dense food with each meal is a necessary habit to implement in your everyday nutrition. Looking for a great protein supplement, recipes, or more tips? Visit Lauraleeshealthyplate.com

HABIT 3: EAT VEGETABLES WITH EACH MEAL

“Eat your vegetables”, something we have all heard from as far back as we can remember. We all have our favorites and we all have those we despise. Hopefully this will motivate even the hard headed veggie haters to try to get a little more veggies in at every meal. Science has demonstrated that in addition to the micronutrients (vitamins and minerals) packed into vegetables, there are also important plant chemicals (phytochemicals) that are essential for optimal physiological functioning. Even more interesting is that vegetables (and fruits) provide an alkaline load (a food intake that generates a slightly higher pH value in the body; base forming) to the blood. Since both proteins and grains present acid loads to the blood, it’s important to balance these acids with alkaline-rich vegetables and fruits. Here is how to ensure that you are getting enough vegetables:

  • Include at least two servings of vegetables and or fruits, (emphasis on vegetables) per meal.
  • Remember, one medium-sized fruit, 1/2 cup raw chopped fruit or vegetables, and 1 cup of raw, leafy vegetables each equal one serving.
  • Work up to getting around 10 servings a day for ideal function.

Here are 5 super fruits and veggies you will always want in your diet. 

  • Spinach
  • Tomatoes
  • Cruciferous vegetables (broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower)
  • Mixed berries
  • Oranges

HABIT 4: FOR FAT LOSS, EAT A MAJORITY OF OTHER CARBOHYDRATES AFTER EXERCISE

Do you like bread, pasta, rice, and or other starchy carbohydrates? Well the good news is that you do not have to forgo these foods you love. Follow these two guidelines and carbs can actually work in your favor.

  1. Eat starchy carbohydrates after vigorous exercise lasting more than an hour.
  2. Choose the unprocessed and unrefined carbohydrates. Yes, that means kick those pop tarts and sugary cereals to the curb!

After bouts of moderate to vigorous exercise, your body can best tolerate carbohydrates and actually store them as good energy in the form of muscle glycogen rather than store the carbohydrates as fat. If your goal is to lose fat then you probably have plenty of glycogen in your muscles for energy, if you eat an excess of carbohydrates at a time when your body is not in need of them, then you will just pack those excess carbs on in the form body fat. starchy-carbsExamples of starchy whole foods to utilize after workouts:

  • corn
  • quinoa
  • oats
  • long grain rice
  • sprouted or whole grain breads and pastas

Examples of *refined sugary carbs to avoid;

  • fruit juice
  • soda
  • sports drinks
  • most nutrition bars

HABIT 5: EAT HEALTHY FATS DAILY

In the 90s, the “low-fat” fad was in full force. Every other food package advertised LOW FAT! Well we now know that about 30% of a person’s diet should come from a balance of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats. Consider this, healthy fats are what we consider a calorie dense food meaning; they pack a calorie punch! So when adding more fats to you diet, most people only need one thumb sized portion of fat at each meal. This means only 8-10 almonds, 1/4th of an avocado, or 1 tablespoon of natural nut butter. You can achieve an optimal balance of healthy fats through eating a balance of foods such as;

  • monounsaturated fats
    • extra virgin olive oil
    • some nuts
    • avocados
  • polyunsaturated fats
    • some nuts
    • some vegetable oils
    • fish oil supplements
  • saturated fats
    • lean beef
    • fish (wild caught)
    • poultry

If you feel like your diet needs a serious overhaul and you have a lot of bad dietary habits, then you should tackle these habits one at a time. If you overeat at every single meal and always feel bloated and miserable, then your main focus should be on Habit 1: Eat slowly and stop at 80% full. Once you get a grip on Habit 1, then you can move on to habit 2.   REFERENCE: THE ESSENTIALS OF SPORT AND EXERCISE NUTRITION. JOHN BERARDI, PHD; RYAN ANDREWS, MS, MA, RD.  2013 PRECISION NUTRITION. INC. PG 346-352.

September 12, 2014

By now you’ve probably heard of Hot Yoga, and hopefully you have experienced the laundry list of benefits that accompany radiant heat. Since the Hot Studio has opened at Wilson’s on Forum we’ve introduced two of the most popular fitness trends and combined them into one building the first Hot Barre program! It is the fastest, most effective program to burn calories and get toned! What could possibly be next? Say hello to one more incredible hot class we’re adding into the mix! We’re bringing you Hot Pilates!

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With a mix of Mat Pilates and the added benefits of radiant heat, Hot Pilates will strengthen your core like never before! The program will incorporate magic circles, balls, and bands to add challenge and variety. Modifications will be utilized to assist in proper form. Your muscle will build with progressive abdominal movements and back strengthening exercises. The heat will get your muscles warm and ready to work as we strengthen and lengthen for a strong core and better posture.

Now at the District we’re bringing you Hot Yoga, Hot Barre, and Hot Pilates! Make your way to class with your mat, towel, water bottle, and get ready for the new 30-minute burn at 95 degrees!

August 5, 2014 If you haven’t driven by Wilson’s Fitness on Rangeline lately, you’ll have to make a detour and come check it out! The progress is speeding up and the windows were installed before we could post the new photo! You see the large expansion, but what’s the plan inside?

Rangeline Map

1. Mind and Body Studio. High ceilings and huge picture windows create a beautiful atmosphere conducive for specialty classes Studio Barre and Aerial Yoga.  2. Group Fitness Studio. Located behind the Mind and Body Studio, the room is twice the size of the current group fitness studio with all new sound equipment-controlled up front by instructor- and state of the art speakers. Lights hung from heigh ceilings enhance the experience. Equipment including kettle bells will be stored behind the galvanized steel doors (think, garage doors) that will lift with the push of a button. 3. Foyer For Studios. A comfortable area to gather before and after class with cubbies for storage and couches for easy socializing. Doors for both studios open onto this foyer. 4. Cardio/Weights.Cardio equipment will line the wall overlooking Big Bear through spacious windows. Expansive floor space for weight equipment and free weights increases the current offering exponentially.  5. Stretching Area. L-shaped padded floor under high ceilings for stretching and floor work overlooks the intersection of Rangeline and Big Bear through big beautiful windows.  6. SGPT Area. Large space for small group personal training housing the Synrgy 360 and other equipment will be available to members when groups aren’t in session.  7. Multi-Purpose Room.The current group studio will house 12-foot wide turf for 2 sleds, a heavy bag, a deadliest platform, boxing stations for sparring practice, and stations for battle ropes. Some BodyPump equipment will remain as GRIT classes and GRIT games will be held in this room. 8. Retail Spaces. Underneath the main level several spaces for lease are available to vendors. Potential for shops, offices, and even restaurants with an available patio will enhance convenience for members as well as attract the public. And with a drive-thru on the property, can anyone say, coffee, please? Interested in leasing? Contact 573.881.6010  9.Additional Parking. In front of the retail shops, an extended driveway and parking space.

By: John Stull, NSCA-CPT, FMSC, ViPR-PT
 July 29, 2014 MAKE YOUR GOALS S.M.A.R.T.
Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Results-focused, and Timely!
Look at the big picture first, where do you want to be? To set effective goals you must first identify the mountain top you want to climb. Then work backwards and plan how you will get there.
EXAMPLE:
July of 2024, I am a competitive sprint athlete and I place in the top 5 every race at 225lbs.
July of 2019, I won my very first Triathlon and beat my personal record of 61 minutes in the Clydesdale category.
July of 2015, I just competed in my first elite division triathlon and finished in the top 20 with a time of 71 minutes.
January of 2015, I can swim freestyle with little effort and great technique, because I hired a swim coach and have been practicing 2-3 a week for the past 6 months.
July 17th of 2014, I make every workout session and I am committed 110% to my training program.
  Whether it be in my career, my fitness/health, or in my personal life, I always like to set a 10 year goal, a 5 year goal, a 1 year goal, a 6 month goal, and a 1 month goal for each area. Every month I check my plan, adjust according to my results, and get back on my path.  WHAT QUALIFIES AS A GOAL?

Specific: Goals should be simplistically written and clearly define what you are going to do. Specific is the what, why, and how of the S.M.A.R.T. model. Measurable: Goals should be measurable so that you have tangible evidence that you have accomplished the goal. Usually, the entire goal statement is a measure for the project, but there are usually several short-term or smaller measurements built into the goal. Attainable: Goals should be realistic, make smaller goals along the way to get you to your long term goal.

Results-focused: Goals should measure outcomes, not activities.
Time-bound: Goals should be linked to a time frame that creates a practical sense of urgency, or results in tension between the current reality and the vision of the goal. Without such tension, the goal is unlikely to produce a relevant outcome.Writing your goals as if they already happened will put the end in your reach. Revisit your goals daily and visualize where you want to be over and over again. Then get to work. Dreaming is not enough, you must put in the hard work. Goals are dreams with deadlines.

Be careful, share your goals with the wrong people and negativity will likely infect your dream. You should share your goals with,  positive, like minded people. Positive people will hold you accountable and support you on your journey!

John is a NSCA-CPT. John specializes in small group personal training and loves to instruct Boot Camps for fitness and weight loss. John’s favorite motto is “Teamwork Makes the Dream Work” because there is nothing more powerful than the support of a community!
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